MASTERS THESIS - Percussionist, Ethnomusicologist, Music Educator | MyrandaHarris.com
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MASTERS THESIS

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About This Project

Recent scholarship has revealed that the representation of Karnatic music as a “classical” art form in South Indian society was a complicated process bound to the agendas of larger early twentieth-century nationalist projects in India. This thesis explores the notions of classicalness as they are enacted in Karnatic music society through the oral transmission process from guru to shishya, or disciple. Still considered one of the most important emblems of the “classical,” the gurukula (lit. “guru-family”) system has been transformed to accommodate more contemporary lifestyles and reinscribed within many other social and musical processes in South Indian classical music society. This thesis examines the everyday interactions between members of Karnatic music society, particularly the clapping of tāla during a Karnatic music concert and the musical exchanges between percussionists onstage during the tani āvartanam (Karnatic percussion solo), as public performances reminiscent of the relationship between guru and shishya.

 

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